Archives for posts with tag: ice cream

Today is Thanksgiving Day in the United States and I have much for which to be thankful. I am thankful for (not necessarily in this order):

– comfortable shoes that fit

– one shoulder that does not hurt

– the Atlanta Braves baseball team (but I am not happy with the front office for recent rules violations).

-my wife of 49 years (in 35 Days)

– my three children and their spouses

– my church where my faith is nurtured by excellent preaching, exceptional music, and friends that are invaluable

– good health (for a man my age)

– the rhythmic sound of ocean waves crashing onto the shore

– civil discourse where mutual respect is practiced

– the privilege of living in the United States

– the Bible and the guidance it gives

– opportunities to travel and experience the wonderful world and it’s diverse peoples and cultures

– my bed and pillow when I return from traveling

– opportunities to serve others

-blues singers like Etta James, B.B. King, Diana Krall, Muddy Waters

– my extraordinary grandchildren (a biased opinion but true nonetheless)

– ice cream

– the laughter of children

– people who are smarter than me who don’t make me feel like an idiot

– Skype webcam

– air conditioning (I live in the Deep South)

– people who love me in spite of myself

– the Comics- especially Peanuts, Pearls Before Swine, Get Fuzzy, Baby Blues, Zits, and Garfield

– preachers, politicians, and other public servants who know it is not about them

– the Church (with all it faults)

– teachers

– the diverse community in which I live

– good food and good friends

– quiet time

– coffee in the morning

– Alex Trebeck and Jeopardy

– hats that protect my bald head from the cold and sun

– neighbors who look out for each other

– soul (southern) food and cornbread

– growing older without getting “old”

– folks who are not like me who like me

– God who loves and forgives me

Jamie Jenkins

 

 

 

 

 

 

Thanksgiving 9

Today is the fourth Thursday in November. That means it is Thanksgiving Day in the United States.

In 1621, the Plymouth colonists and Wampanoag Indians shared in one of the first Thanksgiving celebrations in the colonies. For the next two centuries days of thanksgiving were celebrated by individual colonies and states.

In 1863 President Abraham Lincoln proclaimed that a national Thanksgiving Day be held on the final Thursday in November. Thanksgiving Day was celebrated on that day every year until 1939, when Franklin D. Roosevelt moved the holiday up a week in an attempt to spur retail sales during the Great Depression. There was much opposition to Roosevelt’s plan, known as Franksgiving, and in 1941 the president signed a bill making Thanksgiving the fourth Thursday in November.

This past week I visited several people who are homebound or hospitalized. A common thread in all our conversations was thanksgiving. Repeatedly I heard expressions of gratitude and an acknowledgement that we are blessed beyond our imagination.

Thanksgiving 6

Like many others I will gather with family and friends for an abundant feast today. We will eat a lot and watch seemingly endless football games. All of this is important because it nurtures our relationships, but thanksgiving requires more than a passive attitude.

I am thankful for my family who love me and has always supported me. Therefore I do everything possible to provide whatever they need.

I am thankful for God who loves me unconditionally. Therefore I devote my time, energy, and talents to serve God’s people in the Church and throughout the world.

I am thankful for good health. Therefore I attempt to take advantage of opportunities to learn and explore.

Thanksgiving 7

I am thankful for the freedoms that I enjoy in this country. Therefore I will strive to protect and preserve them for everyone.

I am grateful for all my resources. Therefore I seek to use them not only for myself but for the benefit of humankind.

It would be impossible to list all the things for which I am thankful. There are so many and so many which I simply take for granted. If you are interested, you can take a look at a few of them in the postscript.

Last Sunday Rev. Bill Britt, Senior Minister at Peachtree Road United Methodist Church, said “We don’t give God thanks for our circumstances. We give God thanks in our circumstances.” I think that is what the Apostle Paul meant when he said, “In everything give thanks for this is the will of God for you.” All things that happen to us are not God’s will but God does desire us to always have an attitude of gratitude.

Thanksgiving 3

Author and publisher Fred De Witt Amburgh said, “None is more impoverished than the one who has no gratitude. Gratitude is a currency that we can mint for ourselves, and spend without fear of bankruptcy.” Thanksgiving is not self centered or passive. People with grateful hearts give. According to philanthropist W. Clement Stone, “If you are really thankful, what do you do? You share.”

Thanksgiving is, after all, a word of action. In other words, it is “thanks-living.”

Jamie Jenkins

Thanksgiving 1

P.S. Other things for which I am thankful:

A good cup of coffee in the morning

Grandchildren (and their parents)

Ice cream (especially on weekends)

A wife who love sports (and me)

A safe neighborhood

The internet (when it works)

Skype

A comfortable pair of shoes

Opportunities to travel and see the beauty of God’s earth and its people

An electric car that is fun to drive

Any automobile that gets me where I need to go

All the folks who volunteer in the church and other helping organizations

The Atlanta Braves (wait until next year)

People who give generously of their time, talent, and money for the benefit of others

The United Methodist Church that has nurtured me and my family

My wife’s love for flowers and the beauty of her garden

Music- everything from classical to blues

Story tellers

My children and grandchildren who roll their eyes at my corny jokes but love me any way

The comics and their creators- especially Get Fuzzy (Darby Conley), Overboard (Chip Dunham), Pearls Before Swine (Stephan Pastis)

People who are positive about life no matter the circumstances

A warm house and a comfortable bed at night

Good (clean) jokes

Gifted preachers who work at their craft and deliver meaningful and challenging sermons

Church choirs who work hard to learn their music and offer it in worship

The people of Peachtree Road United Methodist Church for embracing me and my wife

Rainy days and Mondays- and every day whatever the weather

My children’s spouses who love them and enrich our family

 

 

 

 

Ted French shared my love for ice cream and he introduced me to a new flavor, Sugar Free Chocolate Caramel Pecan. On a Tuesday night. I try to discipline myself to eat sweets only on weekends but he said since it was sugar free it would be alright. I accepted his rationale and indulged. Yummy!

I was eating lunch with friends the last time I saw Ted. He rolled up beside me in his motorized chair and handed me a bowl of that delicious ice cream. This particular brand was not sold in retail outlets so the only place I knew to get it was at the restaurant where I first ate it with Ted.

I often longed for that frozen treat. Then I learned that it was made at a creamery I passed regularly. One day the desire to have some Sugar Free Chocolate Caramel Pecan ice cream was too much. So I stopped by the nondescript building that houses the creamery. I inquired if they sold to the public and was told that they did.

“I would like some of the Sugar Free Chocolate Caramel Pecan flavor,” I said. When I was told it came in only one size I said, “That’s fine. I’ll take it.” In a couple of minutes a man arrived from the freezer with a 3-gallon container of ice cream. I thought to myself, “Wow!,” as I took the giant container from him and headed to my car.

Ice Cream 3

There was no one at home (thankfully) when I arrived so I began to rearrange everything in our freezer to make room for this huge carton of ice cream. Needless to say, making room for it was not easy. When my wife came home and opened the freezer she was surprised at what she saw (duh!). But it was OK (?) since she understood how much I like ice cream.

Three gallons of ice cream is a lot! Especially when you eat it only on weekends. Under an ultimatum that it had to be gone before Thanksgiving, we finished it last weekend. And I was glad to see it go. I still like ice cream and I will want some more Sugar Free Chocolate Caramel Pecan flavor in the future but I will enjoy other flavors for a while.

I suspect that you have heard the expression “too much of a good thing.” Well, my ice cream experience described above was certainly that. It was a reminder to me that just about anything in excess is not good. There are so many options available that it is difficult to choose and since we cannot decide, often we try it all. Food, entertainment, leisure, you name it and there is more than can reasonably be accommodated.

excess 10

A menu at a restaurant can be overwhelming. Appetizers, salad and soups, entrees, desserts- and they all sound wonderful. Purchasing an automobile is a daunting experience because there so many makes, models, trim types, colors, accessories. Want a night of entertainment? There seems to be almost unlimited possibilities: movies, performance theaters, action games, sports… the list goes on.  Decide to stay at home and watch television and you can choose from hundreds of channels after you decide between cable, satellite, or one of the many online streaming offerings. How can one not over indulge?

We are captives to the enormous amount of possibilities so we tend to do, eat, watch, and engage more than what is necessary, usual, or specified. I accept the reality that I am inclined to over indulge and I constantly seek to practice moderation- restraint, avoidance of extremes or excesses.excess 9

Philosophy and all major religions emphasize moderation as a key to wholesome living. To avoid excess in actions, desires and even thoughts leads to a healthier lifestyle.

The Book of Sirach is a book of ethical teachings from approximately 200-175 BC. It appears in the Old testament of the Catholic Bible but except for some Episcopal and Lutheran Bibles it and the other 12-15 books of the Apocrypha do not appear in Protestant Bibles. Some Protestant churches include it in their lectionaries and as a book proper for reading, devotion, and prayer. Its influence in early Christianity is evident. Concerning moderation Sirach says, “My child, test yourself while you live; see what is bad for you and do not give into it” (Sirach 37:27).

Words of another very wise man of long ago also recommends restraint in the advice: “Moderation is better than muscle, self-control better than political power” (Proverbs 16:32, The Message).

I know it in my head but it needs to move into my heart and hands. I want to enjoy the good that God provides but I know that too much of a good thing can be bad.

Jamie Jenkins