Archives for posts with tag: football

I grew up on the Gulf Coast in Mobile, Alabama. Except for five years in New York, I have lived my life in the Deep South. I have always enjoyed sports and in my environment that meant baseball, football, basketball, and tennis. Because of the temperate climate in the region ice hockey has not been high on my lists of competitive sports.

Atlanta Flames 1972-73 hockey logo

I saw my first live hockey game in the early 1970s at the Omni in Atlanta. The Atlanta Flames were a professional team of the National Hockey League (NHL) from 1972-1980. The team struggled to establish a fan base and were finally sold and relocated to Alberta, Canada.

NEW OLD STOCK CCM ATLANTA THRASHERS HOCKEY JERSEY JR L / XL NHL LICENSED

The Atlanta area’s growth and the migration of many people from the northern states led to a second NHL franchise being located in the city in 1997. The Thrashers played their home games in Phillips Arena, which had replaced the Omni as a downtown sports venue. I attended one of the team’s games before they met a similar fate as the Flames. They were and moved to Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada in 2011.

Eight years before the Thrashers moved out of town a minor league hockey team relocated to the Atlanta area.  The franchise originated as the Mobile Mysticks but were rebranded as the Gladiators and moved to their new home in suburban Gwinnett County. In 2015, the Gladiators became the affiliate of the Boston BruinS, an NHL Team since 1924.

My two sons, my grandson, and I recently attended a couple of the Gladiators games at the Infinite Energy Arena. We knew none of the players on the Gladiators or their opponent the Florida Everblades. Prior to this, collectively the four of us had attended only a handful of games. It was a first-time experience for my grandson.

Gladiators Hockey Game Dec 2018

None of us had any real attachment to the team or much knowledge about the rules or how the game is played. Nevertheless we joined in cheering our hometown team. When something good happened for the Gladiators we shouted and applauded. When the referee called a penalty against “our” team, we booed. When the same call was made against the other team, we shouted our approval.

Hockey fans at stadium : Stock Photo

I have reflected on the experience of those two hockey games over the past few weeks. I have thought about the way we claimed the home team and was pleased when things didn’t go well for their opponents. We could have just enjoyed the game. The skating ability of the players. The speed of the game. The energy of the teams and the fans. We had no connection to the home team except that they were the Atlanta Gladiators. They represented us and the match was between “us” and “them.”

I wonder how many times the scenario of the hockey game is repeated in other facets of my life. How often do I see things as competition between “Us” and “Them?” Do I view the attitudes and actions of myself and others like me as “right and good” and those of others as “harmful and wrong.”

In examining my behavior at the hockey game I realized how easy it is to “see the splinter that’s in my brother’s or sister’s eye, but don’t notice the log in my own eye.” How easy it is to say to another person,” Let me take the splinter out of your eye,’ when there’s a log in my own eye.”

God, help me to guard against the “US vs. Them” mindset. Help me to see others as my brothers and sisters, creatures of equality and deserving of honor and dignity.

Jamie Jenkins

A bird in the hand is worth two in the bush. Really, how do you know?

Why do children believe anything their friends tell them but question everything their parents tell them?

How can a parent love all their children (no matter how many) and never run out of love?

Why do we put round pizzas in square boxes and then cut them into triangles?

How we can sit for hours in uncomfortable seating and environment for a sporting event but have a hard time sitting for one hour for worship service?

How can items advertised in TV infomercials be so outstanding and cheap- and if you “call now” you get a second item free?

Why do some people dislike other people simply because of the color of their skin or their ethnicity?

After paying a small fortune to attend a ball game or enter an amusement park, why does it cost another fortune to eat?

Wet Paint Sign : Stock Photo

Why do we believe it when we are told there are billions of stars in the sky but when we are told “Wet Paint” we have to test it?

When things I really don’t like are prohibited, why do I crave them?

Why is it chicken fingers when chickens don’t have fingers?

Why do we call it “free time” when all time is a gift?

Why do we say it is a dog eat dog world when we have never seen a dog eat another dog?

Selling Like Hot Cakes cartoons, Selling Like Hot Cakes cartoon, funny, Selling Like Hot Cakes picture, Selling Like Hot Cakes pictures, Selling Like Hot Cakes image, Selling Like Hot Cakes images, Selling Like Hot Cakes illustration, Selling Like Hot Cakes illustrations

Why do we say things are selling like hot cakes?

Why do we say when it rains it pours when sometimes it is just a drizzle?

Does every cloud really have a silver lining?

Do we really believe that when you smile the whole world smiles with you?

Are you sure that flattery gets you nowhere?

Is cleanliness really next to godliness?

If the good die young, then is everyone my age bad?

Why are you assigned a seat for a professional soccer game because you stand for the entire time?

Why do some people find it hard/impossible to believe that God loves them?

Jamie Jenkins

Fantasy Gifts 2016

Every fall the luxury retailer, Neiman Marcus, releases its Christmas Book catalog filled with holiday gift ideas. This year’s edition includes a Private Plane in Rose Gold for $1.5 million, an Exclusive Grammy Awards Experience for $500,000, and a week of luxury living at three English estates for only $700,000. For football fans there is a one-day private quarterback camp with Joe Montana for $65,000.

Fantasy Gifts 2016

One of the new offerings this year has received a lot of attention. Its price is nothing compared with the items listed above. It is collard greens “seasoned with just the right amount of spices and bacon.” The order “ships fully cooked and frozen” and arrives in four 12 ounce trays and serves 8-10 people.

fresh20garlic20greens

The collard greens must be gold plated. That is the only way that servings for 8-10 people could be worth $66 plus $15.50 for shipping. You can buy collard greens at the supermarket for about $2. An Atlanta restaurant owner said you could buy 20 bushels of collard greens that would make 3,000 servings for Neiman Marcus’ price. He probably would agree with the person who posted on Twitter: “Rich or not, if u pay $66 for greens, you’re 1 fry short of a happy meal.”

“The fact that Neiman Marcus is shipping collard greens lets me know it’s almost time for the Lord to return and take us all off earth,” @icanonlybemekh tweeted. The reaction is not limited to the charging nearly a 4,000 percent upcharge. One person was critical of the way Neiman Marcus seasoned their greens. “Cost aside, if you ain’t making your collards with ham hocks or smoked turkey, I got no use for you. Bacon? Nah. #gentrifiedgreens,” @jubimom wrote.

If you think it is insane to pay $81.50 for 10 servings of collard greens, then you might be surprised that Neiman Marcus’ supply was sold out in two days. What do you call that?

Jamie Jenkins

 

 

Thanksgiving 9

Today is the fourth Thursday in November. That means it is Thanksgiving Day in the United States.

In 1621, the Plymouth colonists and Wampanoag Indians shared in one of the first Thanksgiving celebrations in the colonies. For the next two centuries days of thanksgiving were celebrated by individual colonies and states.

In 1863 President Abraham Lincoln proclaimed that a national Thanksgiving Day be held on the final Thursday in November. Thanksgiving Day was celebrated on that day every year until 1939, when Franklin D. Roosevelt moved the holiday up a week in an attempt to spur retail sales during the Great Depression. There was much opposition to Roosevelt’s plan, known as Franksgiving, and in 1941 the president signed a bill making Thanksgiving the fourth Thursday in November.

This past week I visited several people who are homebound or hospitalized. A common thread in all our conversations was thanksgiving. Repeatedly I heard expressions of gratitude and an acknowledgement that we are blessed beyond our imagination.

Thanksgiving 6

Like many others I will gather with family and friends for an abundant feast today. We will eat a lot and watch seemingly endless football games. All of this is important because it nurtures our relationships, but thanksgiving requires more than a passive attitude.

I am thankful for my family who love me and has always supported me. Therefore I do everything possible to provide whatever they need.

I am thankful for God who loves me unconditionally. Therefore I devote my time, energy, and talents to serve God’s people in the Church and throughout the world.

I am thankful for good health. Therefore I attempt to take advantage of opportunities to learn and explore.

Thanksgiving 7

I am thankful for the freedoms that I enjoy in this country. Therefore I will strive to protect and preserve them for everyone.

I am grateful for all my resources. Therefore I seek to use them not only for myself but for the benefit of humankind.

It would be impossible to list all the things for which I am thankful. There are so many and so many which I simply take for granted. If you are interested, you can take a look at a few of them in the postscript.

Last Sunday Rev. Bill Britt, Senior Minister at Peachtree Road United Methodist Church, said “We don’t give God thanks for our circumstances. We give God thanks in our circumstances.” I think that is what the Apostle Paul meant when he said, “In everything give thanks for this is the will of God for you.” All things that happen to us are not God’s will but God does desire us to always have an attitude of gratitude.

Thanksgiving 3

Author and publisher Fred De Witt Amburgh said, “None is more impoverished than the one who has no gratitude. Gratitude is a currency that we can mint for ourselves, and spend without fear of bankruptcy.” Thanksgiving is not self centered or passive. People with grateful hearts give. According to philanthropist W. Clement Stone, “If you are really thankful, what do you do? You share.”

Thanksgiving is, after all, a word of action. In other words, it is “thanks-living.”

Jamie Jenkins

Thanksgiving 1

P.S. Other things for which I am thankful:

A good cup of coffee in the morning

Grandchildren (and their parents)

Ice cream (especially on weekends)

A wife who love sports (and me)

A safe neighborhood

The internet (when it works)

Skype

A comfortable pair of shoes

Opportunities to travel and see the beauty of God’s earth and its people

An electric car that is fun to drive

Any automobile that gets me where I need to go

All the folks who volunteer in the church and other helping organizations

The Atlanta Braves (wait until next year)

People who give generously of their time, talent, and money for the benefit of others

The United Methodist Church that has nurtured me and my family

My wife’s love for flowers and the beauty of her garden

Music- everything from classical to blues

Story tellers

My children and grandchildren who roll their eyes at my corny jokes but love me any way

The comics and their creators- especially Get Fuzzy (Darby Conley), Overboard (Chip Dunham), Pearls Before Swine (Stephan Pastis)

People who are positive about life no matter the circumstances

A warm house and a comfortable bed at night

Good (clean) jokes

Gifted preachers who work at their craft and deliver meaningful and challenging sermons

Church choirs who work hard to learn their music and offer it in worship

The people of Peachtree Road United Methodist Church for embracing me and my wife

Rainy days and Mondays- and every day whatever the weather

My children’s spouses who love them and enrich our family