Archives for posts with tag: Christ Child

In just a few days it will Christmas Day, the day we celebrate the birth of the Christ Child. At Christmas Eve services the night before, people all over the world will sing, “Joy to the world, the Lord is come!”

On the evening the Bethlehem Baby was born there were shepherds nearby tending their flocks. Their everyday routine. Suddenly the scene changed and an angel appeared among them and the surroundings lit up. They were understandably terrified. Then the angel told them not to be afraid. Oh sure!

Right in the middle of their workaday world an angel appears and the landscape lights up. What are they expected to feel if not fear?

Then the angel said, ““I bring you good news of great joy which will be for all the people. For this day in the city of David there has been born for you a Savior, who is Christ the Lord.”

Good news! Great joy! A Savior!

The shepherds responded by rushing to see for themselves what the angel proclaimed. Seeing was believing and they told everyone they met what the angel had said about this child.

It has been more than twenty centuries since that event in Bethlehem. Millions have heard the story and have believed. Millions others have heard but have not believed. One reason for this unbelief might be that we who follow Christ have not been the joyful creatures that we should be.

The shepherds rejoiced at the good news of a Savior. They returned to their work “glorifying and praising God.” The Apostle Paul suggests that we who have been redeemed by that same Jesus should likewise be filled with joy- not only at Christmas but at all times. “Always be full of joy in the Lord; I say it again, rejoice!” (Philippians 4:4, TLB)

Teilhard de Chardin, says, “Joy is the infallible sign of the presence of God.” Acknowledging the Presence of God in our lives will not only enrich our living, it will also be contagious. Mother Teresa suggests that “Joy is a net of love by which you can catch souls.”

Be joyful for a Savior has come!

Jamie Jenkins

 

Close-up of Multi Colored Figurine

This week includes two very important dates. First of all, this past Monday was Christmas Day. It is a high holy day for people all over the world because it is the celebration of Jesus Christ. The birth of that baby in the tiny town of Bethlehem was an event that has changed the world and divided time.

TFree stock photo of decoration, christmas, celebration, goldhanks to my wife, our house was beautifully decorated for the Advent Season as we anticipated Christmas. I was blessed by the devotional thoughts that the staff and many members of our church shared. My family and I participated in worship services and attended several musical programs leading up to December 25. It was a joyful and hope filled season. Then on Christmas Day we enjoyed visiting with friends as we gathered around the table for a holiday feast.

Christmas Crib Figures, Christmas

On December 25, near the end of the calendar year, Christmas reminded us of God’s promise of peace on earth.

Close-up of Wedding Rings on Floor

Today, December 28, is the second day of significance for me. Forty-nine years ago today my wife and I vowed to love one another “for better, for worse, for richer, for poorer, in sickness and in health, to love and to cherish, until we are parted by death.”

When we stood at the altar of that little church on Stone Street in Mobile, Alabama three days after Christmas in 1968 I could not have imagined how wonderful marriage would be. Also, I had no idea how difficult it is to merge two distinctly different personalities into a unit of mutual respect and love. But over the years I have come to realize that two can become one without either individual being lost in the process.

There have been many challenges as well as joyous experiences. Struggles and triumphs. I am grateful that Lena has stuck with me through the good times and the tough times. “A true lover always feels in debt to the one he loves” (Ralph W. Sockman). I would not call myself a “true lover” but I certainly acknowledge that I am indebted to her.

Victor Hugo said, “Life’s greatest happiness is to be convinced we are loved.” I have never doubted her love as she has been my chief critic and number one cheerleader. She has traveled with me through three states, nine houses, and many different contexts. She raised our three children with minimal help from me. She is a strong woman, a wonderful wife, and a great mother/grandmother.

“We recognize a soulmate by the supreme level of comfort and security we feel with that person. That doesn’t mean that there aren’t issues that remain to be ironed out. Rather, it means we know intuitively that we can resolve issues … without losing his or her love and respect” (Linda Brady). I am grateful for 49 years of marriage to my soulmate and I am excited about our future together.

Jamie Jenkins

The lights, nativity sets and all the decorations help me get into the spirit of the season but the music really plays an important part in my preparation for celebrating the birth of the Christ Child.

Singer Nat 'King' Cole and his daughter Natalie Cole pose for a portrait session in front of a Christmas tree in circa 1955

Nat King Cole and his daughter, c. 1955. Michael Ochs Archives/Getty Images

One website (https://www.thoughtco.com/top-christmas-songs-3245323) listed “The Christmas Song” as the Number One song of the season. Co-written by singer Mel Torme, it was recorded at least three times by Nat King Cole, but the 1961 recording is often considered the best. Hearing “Chestnuts Roasting on an Open Fire” puts you in the mood for the winter holiday.Judy Garland, as Esther Smith, in "Meet Me In St Louis," 1944.

Another classic is “Have Yourself a Merry Little Christmas” sung by Judy Garland in the 1944 movie musical “Meet Me In St. Louis”. The filmmakers complained that in the first version, the song’s lyrics were too depressing and commissioned a rewrite that became the most popular interpretation.

Bing Crosby White Christmas

“White Christmas” introduced in the 1942 movie musical “Holiday Inn” won an Academy Award for Best Song From a Motion Picture. Bing Crosby’s version from the film has sold over 50 million copies. Little Drummer Boy was composed  by Katherine K. Davis in 1941. It was popularized in an arrangement by the Harry Simeone Chorale. An animated TV special was created based on the song’s story in 1968.

 

 

picture of rudolph red nosed reindeer - Digitally painted - JPG

Frosty the Snowman is another standard of the Christmas season. And you can’t leave out the story of Rudolph, Santa’s 9th reindeer, created by Montgomery Ward employee Robert L. May in 1939, adapted into song and turned into a hit by Gene Autry in 1949 and later by Burl Ives. Another standard is “Jingle Bells” which was first copyrighted under the title “One Horse Open Sleigh” in 1857. It has become one of the most popular Christmas songs around the world.

Brenda Lee Rockin' Around the Christmas Tree

There are many other songs that are popular but not among my favorites. Brenda Lee’s “”Rockin’ Around the Christmas Tree” (1958) and “Santa Claus Is Coming to Town,” written in 1934 and first performed on the Eddie Cantor radio show, are among them.

Add to the list “All I Want for Christmas Is You” (1994), “Jingle Bell Rock” (1957), “Grandma Got Run Over By a Reindeer” (1978), “I Saw Mommy Kissing Santa Claus” (1956), and “Blue Christmas” (1948) and you have more than enough “Christmas” music.

stock photo of silent night - Silent night in suburban setting - JPG

I can enjoy some of the songs listed above and tolerate others but the “real” sounds are Christmas are found in the Christmas carols like Silent Night, It is believed that Silent Night was first composed in German in 1816. The song was later translated into English and sung by both sides in the World War I Christmas truce due to the fact it was the primary Christmas carol that both German and British soldiers knew.

joy to the world, heard the bells on christmas day, vintage sheet music, christmas hymn, public domain christmas song, free sheet music graphic

I can’t imagine  Christmas without singing Joy to the World written by Isaac Watts using Scripture for the lyrics or O Holy Night composed in 1847. Another that must be sung during the period leading up to Christmas Day is It Came Upon a Midnight Clear, written by Unitarian pastor Edmund Sears in 1849.

Don’t forget Angels We Have Heard on High which originated as a French carol but was translated into the English version in the mid-1800’s. Surely you will also want to sing We Three Kings written by Reverend John Henry Hopkins, Jr. together for a Christmas pageant at New York’s General Theological Seminary in the mid-1800’s.

Printable Christmas songs; 'O Come All Ye Faithful' is the only song I know how to sing in Latin. I want to do a journal page about this at some point...

Any musical journey toward Christmas has to include Hark! The Herald Angels Sing written by Charles Wesley, brother of John Wesley the founder of Methodism. The first publication date for the carol was 1739. One of the best known carols is O Come All Ye Faithful, dating to the mid-1700’s and is often performed in Latin as “Adeste Fidelis.”

The birth of Jesus occurred in a relatively small and unimportant town. After visiting the birthplace of the Christ Child in 1865, Episcopal priest Phillips Brooks was inspired to write the words to O Little Town of Bethlehem.

Okay, by now I hope you are whistling, humming, or singing some of the Christmas Carols and adding to the sounds of the season. Hopefully they help you prepare for the High Holy Day that marks the time that God took on human form in the Person of Jesus, the Savior of the World.

Jamie Jenkins

What i

 

 

 

Jimmy Carter

For nearly 50 years Law Day was one of the traditions of the University of Georgia. Randall Balmer, journalist for the Hartford Courant, described it as “an occasion to honor student achievements as well as to invite distinguished guests, ranging from Supreme Court justices and attorneys general to cabinet members and politicians of national stature.”  The last Law Day was on March 31, 2000.

The featured speaker of Law Day in 1974 was Edward M. Kennedy, the senior senator from Massachusetts. A couple of hours after Kennedy’s keynote address, Jimmy Carter, the governor of  Georgia, addressed the group. His lecture on justice upstaged Sen. Kennedy who at that time was considered the front-runner for the 1976 Democratic presidential nomination

Carter attributed his sense of justice to two main sources, Reinhold Niebuhr and Bob Dylan. He said it was Dylan’s song, “I Ain’t Gonna Work on Maggie’s Farm No More,” that led him to begin to focus on the needs of ordinary people like the tenant farmers he had known in south Georgia.

Bob Dylan

Carter lamented that “the powerful and the influential in our society shape the laws and have a great influence on the legislature or the Congress.” He criticized their “commitment to the status quo” that preserves the “privileged position in society.” He concluded his remarks by saying that “the course of human events, even the greatest historical events, are not determined by the leaders of a nation or a state, like Presidents or governors or senators. They are controlled by the combined wisdom and courage and commitment and discernment and unselfishness and compassion and love and idealism of the common ordinary people.”

God has always demonstrated a concern for ordinary people. Jesus announced his calling was to “preach good news to the poor, to proclaim release to the prisoners,  recovery of sight to the blind, liberate the oppressed…”

God has often chosen ordinary people to carry on the work of redemption and reconciliation in the world. Just look at the people He chose to be his closest associates. Ordinary people.

Advent 12

Last Sunday was the Second Sunday of Advent. The lectionary scripture was the announcement of the angel Gabriel to Mary that she had been chosen to be the mother of Jesus (Luke 1:26-38). Ave Maria is the musical setting of the Latin text which was originally published in 1853.

Mary was young in a world where age was venerated. She was poor in a world that belonged to the rich. She was a woman in a world where gender equity was not even an afterthought. In every sense she was an ordinary individual. But Gabriel said, “You are highly favored. The Lord is with you.”

We see ordinary people throughout the Advent Season as we prepare to celebrate the birthday of our Savior. John  the Baptist came as a “voice in the wilderness” calling for people to prepare for the coming of the Messiah. Eugene Peterson’s The Message says, “His message was simple and austere, like his desert surroundings.”

Shepherd

As we come nearer to Christmas Day we meet an anonymous inn keeper who provided a place away from the chaos of the moment for Mary to give birth to Jesus. Then we encounter the shepherds. As they “watched their flocks by night” God revealed to them that a child born in their nearby town was the Savior of the world, the Messiah. These ordinary people were perhaps the first to see the Christ Child.

Poh Fang Chia, writing in Our Daily Bread said, “Today, God is still calling ordinary people to do His work and assuring us that He will be with us as we do. Because we are ordinary people being used by God, it’s obvious that the power comes from God and not from us.” The devotional for July 8, 2015 ends with a prayer that is appropriate as we make our way through Advent. “Lord, I am just an ordinary person, but You are an all-powerful God. I want to serve You. Please show me how and give me the strength.”

Jamie Jenkins