Archives for posts with tag: achievement

Helen Hayes was often introduced as “First Lady of American Theater” for her outstanding accomplishments on stage and screen. She is one of only 15 people who have collected an Emmy, a Grammy, an Oscar and a Tony Award.

Hayes also received the Presidential Medal of Freedom, America’s highest civilian honor, from President Ronald Reagan in 1986. In 1988, she was awarded the National Medal of Arts.

Ms. Hayes began her stage career at an early age. With her mother’s encouragement she attended dance classes as a youngster and made her stage debut as a five-year-old singer at Washington’s Belasco Theater, on Lafayette Square, across from the White House. At age nine, she made her Broadway debut as Little Mimi in the Victor Hugo operetta Old Dutch, and at age 10 she was cast in the one-reel film Jean and the Calico Cat.

Early in her life Ms. Hayes’ mother gave her this advice: “Achievement is the knowledge that you have studied and worked hard and done the best that is in you. Success is being praised by others, and that’s nice too, but not as important or satisfying. Always aim for achievement and forget about success.”

According to her daughter-in-law, Hayes took the most pride in her philanthropic work with Helen Hayes Hospital, a physical rehabilitation hospital located in West Haverstraw, NY. She was extremely proud of the strides the hospital made toward the rehabilitation of people with disabilities, saying, “I’ve seen my name in lights on theater marquees and in letters 20 feet tall on Broadway billboards, but nothing has ever given me greater sense of pride and satisfaction than my 49-year association with this unique hospital.”

The life of this famous actor is a reminder that success might make one happy whereas achievement makes one proud. George Washington Carver said, “There is no shortcut to achievement. Life requires thorough preparation – veneer isn’t worth anything.” Dr. Bo Bennett agrees, “The discipline you learn and character you build from setting and achieving a goal can be more valuable than the achievement of the goal itself.”

Writing in Forbes Magazine, Jim Blasingame says that “Today success is synonymous with celebrating at the finish line, holding the trophy or the check, while achievement has more of a work and effort connotation.” However, he suggests that we build “more memories of the journey of work and effort toward your goals than of the high fives at the end.” He concludes by saying, “No one lives their life in the winner’s circle. Strive for success, but focus on achievement.”

As followers of Jesus Christ we are not called to be successful but we are expected to apply ourselves and do our best at everything we do. The Apostle Peter instructs us to do everything so that God will be honored (I Peter 4:11). The Apostle Paul also emphasizes that everything we do should be for the glory of God (I Corinthians 10:31).

Lord, help us to live as faithful disciples striving to be the best we can be always seeking to serve others.

Jamie Jenkins

 

 

 

When he was 12 years old one of my children told me and his mother that he was passionate about playing the violin. My wife replied, “If you were passionate, we would not have to make you practice.”

Just to like something and even to get some satisfaction from it does not equate into passion. But when an activity, person, or thing elicits intense emotions or strong feelings from you, it may be appropriate to say you feel passionate for it.

Discipline 4

Felling passionate can be a good thing but passion alone will not lead to the desired results. Discipline is the bridge between desire and fulfillment. Discipline- an activity, exercise, or regimen- is necessary to move from goals to accomplishment. Desire and discipline go hand in hand.

Gary Ryan Blair said, “Discipline is based on pride, on meticulous attention to details, and on mutual respect and confidence. Discipline must be a habit so ingrained that it is stronger than the excitement of the goal or the fear of failure.”

Dr. Sherwood Elliot Wirt was a long time associate of Billy Graham and the founding editor of the evangelist’s Decision Magazine. Before his death in 2001 at the age of 97, he wrote more than 40 books and had a tremendous impact on the lives and careers of multitudes of writers.

Dr. Wirt was a guest lecturer in one of my college English classes. That was many years ago but I still remember his reply to a question of one of my classmates. The student asked, “Where do you begin to become a writer? ” His reply was, “Get a piece of paper and a pen (I told you it was a long time ago) and start writing.”

One element of Dr. Wirt’s response was that you have to do more that want to do something. You actually have to do it. That takes a certain amount of discipline and if you want to succeed at any task you have to work at it.

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Near the end of his life Jesus had a conversation with his closest friends. He cautioned them that being his disciple would be difficult and could be costly. When excuses were given for not following him at the moment, he replied, “No one who puts his hand to the plow and looks back” was ready to follow him. In other words, there is a price to pay for anything that is important. Discipline and sacrifice are required.

This year is the 50th anniversary of The Sound of Music movie. Julie Andrews, one of the stars of the movie, said in a recent interview, “Some people regard discipline as a chore. For me, it is a kind of order that sets me free to fly.”

Zig Ziglar Discipline quotes | Inspiration Boost | Inspiration Boost

One study a couple of years ago by Wilhelm Hoffman, found that well disciplined people are happier than those without. M. Scott Peck agreed when he said, “Discipline is wisdom and vice versa.”

Lord help us to discipline ourselves so we can complete the tasks and achieve the goals that are good for us and for all humanity.

Jamie Jenkins