Self Sufficiency 12

I think I am a rather low maintenance individual. You can ask my wife to be sure. I realize I cannot make it alone but I tend to think that I am an independent person for the most part. I don’t whine about my circumstances (too often) and I don’t require a lot of attention.

At this point I can see eyes rolling in some of you who are reading this. Your experience with me or your perception of me is somewhat different from the image I am projecting. I get that. No one really knows themselves fully. Our self awareness is not always on target.

I saw a cartoon the other day in which one elderly woman says to another, “I think my house is haunted. Every time I look in the mirror some old woman gets in the way so I can’t see myself.” The image we hold of ourselves is easily skewed and reality evades us. Even when we see things clearly it is easy to rationalize our weaknesses and offer excuses for our failures.

Self Sufficiency 4

Self awareness is important for good relationships and personal mental health. If we live with an illusion of who we really are, others will find it difficult and we will never realize our full potential.

 

I hope that my assessment of myself as “low maintenance” is accurate. If not, feel free to give me your perspective and I will try to learn from you so I can become all that God created me to be.

Self Sufficiency 1If I am wrong about my need for support and attention or if my feeling of self sufficiency is simply a fantasy, I need to know it so I can make necessary adjustments to become a healthy person. If I require more than I think I do from others, it will be helpful to be aware of it so I can seek out persons who can and will provide balance and wholeness.

I find fulfillment in giving to others and offering support for persons in need but I understand that giving and receiving go hand in hand. Being on the receiving end is difficult for me. I am much more comfortable when I am the one offering help. That trait is not necessarily a good one because human relationships require give and take interactions. Breathing in and breathing out.

“Individuals motivated by self-interest, self-indulgence, and a false sense of self-sufficiency pursue selfish ambition for the purpose of self-glorification.” -C.J.Mahaney

I am sure that I have held God and others at arm’s length with my “I can do it by myself” attitude. My over-dependence on my own abilities is a liability, not an asset.

A truly healthy individual is one who knows and properly uses their strengths and acknowledges and seeks help in their areas of weakness. An over emphasis of one’s strengths leads to egoism and narcissism. Lack of awareness of one’s weaknesses and failure to address them can result in undesirable consequences.

Self Sufficiency 8

The Apostle Paul teaches us that we are incomplete without each other. We are admonished to “pour ourselves out for each other in acts of love” and to “move rhythmically and easily with each other, efficient and graceful” (Ephesians 4).

Jesus teaches us that we are not sufficient on our own. He said, “I am the vine; you are the branches. If you remain in me and I in you, then you will produce much fruit. Without me, you can’t do anything” (John 15:5).

Self Sufficiency 15

Psalm 8 extols the greatness of humankind. The psalmist says that when we examine all that the Creator has made, human beings are a minute but important part of the plan with significant abilities and responsibilities. However, we are not all sufficient. We depend on God’s protection and provision. We are not alone in this earthly endeavor. John Wesley reminded us, “Best of all, God is with us.”

And we need God!

“Self-sufficiency is the enemy of salvation. If you are self-sufficient, you have no need of God. If you have no need of God, you do not seek Him. If you do not seek Him, you will not find Him.” –William Nicholson

I am who I am but I am incomplete without others and, most importantly, without God.

Jamie Jenkins

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